Lincolnton Divorce Attorney 2017-03-03T07:35:02+00:00

ABSOLUTE DIVORCE

Understanding North Carolina Divorce Law

North Carolina is a “no-fault” divorce state, which means that neither party has the right to file for a divorce without providing fault or having the permission of the other spouse.

In North Carolina, a divorce is called an “absolute divorce”.  To qualify, you must meet the following criteria:

  • One spouse has lived in North Carolina for at least six months;
  • The parties have lived separate and apart for one year;

Why use Lincolnton Family Law:

Finalizing an absolute divorce in North Carolina is very routine.  Lincolnton Family Law handles the process from the beginning to end without you having to step into a court room.

An absolute divorce in North Carolina ends the right to file for property distribution, post separation support, or alimony.   This is why having an experienced family law attorney is essential.

What Our Client’s Say

There’s not enough words to describe the effort given by Jennifer Hames in reference to my custody case.I was given 1 weeks notice of the first court date and also reside over 700 miles away.I explained to her via phone my dilemma and she immediately offered to represent me.The distance never impeded on her ability to assemble the case together in an exemplary manner.The positive results in the latest hearing proved without a doubt the capability and expertise of Ms. Hames.I would highly recommend her legal services to everyone!
Tracy

Post-Separation Support and Alimony in North Carolina

You need an attorney that can address your specific financial support needs. No two cases are alike. Jennifer will review your affidavits, banking records, and other financial documents to prepare for trial and to ensure your needs are addressed for post-divorce.

Equitable Distribution

Marriage in North Carolina conveys certain property rights between spouses. You need an attorney that can sort through the marital estate and represent your interest through litigation or mediation. The rules vary depending depending on how and when property or debt has been acquired. Most importantly, this area addresses the division of retirement and investment accounts.

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